About Deep Creek

Deep-Creek_small

Deep Creek

click on any photo to see a larger view

boulder-hole brown

 

stream frog

 

rattler rainbow

 

rainbow-II tarantula

Photos contributed by: Bernard Yin and Pat Emerick

 

Deep Creek starts in the San Bernardino National Forest running 23 miles into the Mohave desert. Because of a recent fire that occurred in 1999, some of the prime fishing spots were destroyed. Although,some of the Creek remains intact, for the most part, the damage of the Creek far outweighs the beauty and extravagance that it once had held.

Burned-out

 

Within Deep Creek are other branches that flow into the main stream. Holcomb Creek flows from the northward from the San Bernardino Mountains and joins at the Mojave River, eventually providing a major source of water for desert residents. Both streams flow through jagged canyons while their waters rush forward crashing against massive stones pausing in fishing pools as they rush toward the desert from the mountains. Conifers and Willows grow wildly along this creek, along with Sycamore, Cottonwood, Cactus, and other shrubbery.

 

Deep Creek was designated by the state of California as a "Wild Trout Stream". Deep Creek has been known to be streaming with Rainbow ( Salmo gardnerii ) and Brown trout ( Salmo trutta ) for fly-fisherman. Fishing from Green Valley Lake down to Willow Creek is restricted to two fish using barb-less lures and Fly's only, Not only does Deep Creek have a large presence of trout, but it is also inhabited by many other animals, many of them endangered species. For instance the Arroyo Toad, named after it location is a small frog ranging in several colors from gray to light brown to green. Another example is the Mojave chub, which was once known for it being the only fish native to the Mojave River, but because of recent introductions of other fish it has been forced out of its habitat and is now in danger of extinction. Other wildlife found here include the California Spotted Owl, mountain lions, Black bears, deer, flying squirrel and nesting golden eagles. The upper creek area supplies a environment for several endangered plants. Another great thing about Deep Creek is the powerful serene view. The Pacific Crest Trail travels along Deep Creek joining at Holcomb Creek to provide this wonderful view, and access to the relaxing Deep Creek Hot Springs. Due to a fire in '99 there have been restrictions placed upon the Springs, however for a mere $ 4.00 per person-from the ranch, which is a small price to pay to relax and enjoy it's natural breathtaking beauty. Deep Creek and its outstanding scenery, are filled with it's proud history and strong culture, all the while providing recreational enjoyment with the fish, wildlife, and environment. As you can see, it is truly a privilege to be the namesake of this wonderful, history-filled Creek. How To Get There From the desert end, take the Main Street exit Interstate 15, and proceed through the City of Hesperia. As Main Street curves right and turns into Arrowhead Lake Road, turn left on Rock Springs Road. Turn right on Deep Springs Road and proceed to trailhead on the east side of the Mojave flood control dam. North and South Forks of Bear Creek to State Highway 44 bridge crossing

from San Bernardino side Recreation And Visitor Information For maps and up to date trail information, contact the Forest Service's Arrowhead Ranger Station at: Arrowhead Ranger Station (909) 337-2444. other options are Mill Creek Ranger Station 909-794-1123 Big Bear Ranger Station 909-866-3437 Report Fish and Game violations 1-800-952-5400 Don't drink the water No glass containers are allowed within a mile of Deep Creek, it is a 500 dollar fine. No overnight camping "Remember good roads lead to bad fishing"

 

Within Deep Creek are other branches that flow into the main stream. Holcomb Creek flows from the northward from the San Bernardino Mountains and joins at the Mojave River, eventually providing a major source of water for desert residents. Both streams flow through jagged canyons while their waters rush forward crashing against massive stones pausing in fishing pools as they rush toward the desert from the mountains. Conifers and Willows grow wildly along this creek, along with Sycamore, Cottonwood, Cactus, and other shrubbery.

 

Deep Creek was designated by the state of California as a "Wild Trout Stream". Deep Creek has been known to be streaming with Rainbow ( Salmo gardnerii ) and Brown trout ( Salmo trutta ) for fly-fisherman. Fishing from Green Valley Lake down to Willow Creek is restricted to two fish using barb-less lures and Fly's only,  Not only does Deep Creek have a large presence of trout, but it is also inhabited by many other animals, many of them endangered species. For instance the Arroyo Toad, named after it location is a small frog ranging in several colors from gray to light brown to green. Another example is the Mojave chub, which was once known for it being the only fish native to the Mojave River, but because of recent introductions of other fish it has been forced out of its habitat and is now in danger of extinction. Other wildlife found here include the California Spotted Owl, mountain lions, Black bears, deer, flying squirrel and nesting golden eagles. The upper creek area supplies a environment for several endangered plants.

 

Another great thing about Deep Creek is the powerful serene view. The Pacific Crest Trail travels along Deep Creek joining at Holcomb Creek to provide this wonderful view, and access to the relaxing Deep Creek Hot Springs. Due to a fire in '99 there have been restrictions placed upon the Springs, however for a mere $ 4.00 per person-from the ranch, which is a small price to pay to relax and enjoy it's natural breathtaking beauty. Deep Creek and its outstanding scenery, are filled with it's proud history and strong culture, all the while providing recreational enjoyment with the fish, wildlife, and environment. As you can see, it is truly a privilege to be the namesake of this wonderful, history-filled Creek.


How To Get There

From the desert end, take the Main Street exit off Interstate 15, and proceed through the City of Hesperia. As Main Street curves right and turns into Arrowhead Lake Road, turn left on Rock Springs Road. Turn right on Deep Springs Road and proceed to trailhead on the east side of the Mojave flood control dam.

 

North and South Forks of Bear Creek to State Highway 44 bridge crossing from San Bernardino side


Recreation And Visitor Information

 

For maps and up to date trail information, contact the Forest Service's Arrowhead Ranger Station at:

Arrowhead Ranger Station (909) 337-2444.

 

Other options are:


Mill Creek Ranger Station 909-794-1123
Big Bear Ranger Station 909-866-3437
Report Fish and Game violations 1-800-952-5400

 

  • Don't drink the water
  • No glass containers are allowed within a mile of Deep Creek, it is a 500 dollar fine.
  • No overnight camping

 

"Remember good roads lead to bad fishing"